If someone dies in Andorra

First Steps
If the death occurs at home:

  • Call the regular doctor – they can then come round, confirm the death and prepare the certificate of confirmation (unless they decide an autopsy is needed.
  • If outside regular surgery hours – dial 116 (if necessary ask for somebody who speaks English) – tell them a death has occurred – they will send a doctor who can confirm the death and prepare the certificate of confirmation (unless they decide an autopsy is needed).
  • Also call a funeral company directly (see list below) or if outside regular business hours call 831236 or 807180 for 24 hour “on duty” funeral company service.
  • Find the deceased’s residencia and passport for the doctor and funeral company to take correct details.
  • Give the funeral company the certificate of confirmation of death; the funeral company will take the body to the mortuary at the hospital.
  • Be prepared to think about funeral arrangements

If the death occurs at the hospital:

  • A certificate of confirmation of death is issued (by the duty doctor).
  • The “on duty” funeral company will take the body to the hospital mortuary; the use of a funeral company for this service does not imply that this funeral company has to be used for any further services.
  • The funeral company will need to see the deceased’s passport and residencia to take correct details and will also take the certificate of confirmation of death.

Note – it is important that the correct details are taken – be aware that women who are or have been married will generally be known to the hospital by their maiden names – which may cause initial confusion compared to passport details.
In order to carry out the “official” processes they provide, the funeral company will need the passport and residencia of the deceased.

The funeral company will also require a set of suitable clothes for the deceased. Note that it is normal for the body to be displayed in a glass topped casket at the mortuary and for members of the family to be in attendance while friends and neighbours come to pay their last respects. This is a local custom that is not obligatory – but arrangements will be made for this unless they are specifically stopped.